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Writing Articles With Style - Create Quality Articles With CSS

css cascading style sheetsCSS - Cascading Style SheetsWriting your quality articles using Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), will insure that your articles will be both easy to read, and aesthetically pleasing to the viewer.

A CSS style sheet allows the HTML code for your articles to be cleaner, table-less, easily customizable, and "liquid."

Removing the display attributes of your articles from the HTML code allows you to concentrate on using the HTML for organizing your document's content.

When you use CSS, a new approach is possible to writing your articles for the Web:

* First, you write your article in a very basic HTML document, using simple HTML code. At this stage, use only the most common HTML tags. Focus on organizing your article's content first.

* Next, you identify parts of your document for special display formatting.

* Finally, you define the formatting in the CSS file.

Once you work through this process, you can re-use both the HTML document and the CSS file as templates for your future, quality articles.

This article will provide the tips, tricks, and sample code to give you a head start in creating your own quality articles, and templates using CSS. If this all seems complex and intimidating at first, don't despair--read on. I will explain the basic HTML and CSS terminology throughout the article.

basic HTMLBasic-HTMLTHE BASIC HTML DOCUMENT

The basic HTML document is divided into several sections: html, head, and body.

Tags are used to demarcate document sections, or "elements." Content lies between the tags. For example, the article you are now reading lies between the body tags of an html document.

Tags usually exist in pairs, a start tag and an end tag. The start tag is surrounded by less - than and greater than - angle brackets. An end tag is bracketed with the same symbols, but the first character of the tag is a forward slash (/). For example, HTML code for a paragraph element would include the start and end "p" tags with the content sandwiched between the two.

The basic tag pairs found in web pages are:

* html -- These tags tell a browser that this is an HTML document, and define the start and end of the document.

* head -- The head element can contain information about the document. Although the browser does not present the information to a viewer, the information can be "seen" and used by search engines.

* title -- The title tags define the title element that will be used by a browser for the document's title.

* body -- The document's content is placed between the body tags.

The first line of code in the basic document is the Document Type Definition (DTD). The !DOCTYPE tag tells the browser which HTML or XHTML specification the document uses. HTML 4.01 specifies three document types: Strict, Transitional, and Frameset.

basics html tags in web designingBasics - HTML Tags in Web DesignThe first meta tag in the basic HTML document provides information about how the page content characters are encoded, so that a browser can interpret them correctly.

If you want your articles to be widely seen on the Internet, you need to be particularly interested in the meta tags for keywords and description. These can be seen and used by search engines.

Use the "keyword name" and its related "content" in a meta tag to list your keywords or keyword phrases.

Keywords ought to be appropriate for the article content. They should also reflect what internet surfers actually type into a search engine's query box when hunting for the information you are offering.

Keyword research is a study in itself. Freeware is available on the Internet that can help you determine the best keywords to use in your article and keyword list. Keywords or keyword phrases within the meta tag need to be separated from each other with a comma.< />

Although not all search engines will utilize the description meta tag for their search results, you still need to include a good description for those that do.

If you had just a few characters to describe your article, or to entice a surfer to select yours from the results of a search, what would you write? What you would write is what should go into the description.

css website planningCSS Website PlanningUSING CASCADING STYLE SHEETS (CSS)

I have already suggested several reasons why today's preferred method of creating web pages is to separate a page's content from it's display properties. It's time for a demonstration of how this can be accomplished.

In the past, HTML tags included attributes to define how the content was to be displayed by a browser.

Today, CSS is used to concentrate these attributes in a single, separate file. Simple HTML code specifies "what" content is to be displayed; the CSS code defines "how" the content is to be displayed.

Before CSS can be used to format an HTML document, the name and location of the CSS file must be known to the browser. The browser gets this information through the HTML "link" tag that is coded between the head tags.

Once the CSS file is linked, the browser will check the CSS file for display attributes. For example, if the browser encounters an "h1" tag in the HTML code, it will check the CSS file for "h1" formatting. Here is the "h1" formatting information I included in the article.css file I use for my article titles:

h1

{

color:maroon;

text-align:center

}

When a browser encounters an "h1" tag in the HTML code, it would display the title centered and maroon.

HTML content formattingHTML Content for FormattingSELECTING CONTENT FOR FORMATTING

Content formatting can be applied to an HTML document only after the content to be formatted has been identified to the browser. An easy way to do this is to place a "class" or "id" attribute within a start tag. The same class name can be used many times on a web page; each id name should be used just once per page.

Once content is identified, the class or id name can be referred to in the CSS file and the browser will apply any formatting attributes found there.

Selections Using Class Names

As an example of using the class name, I used the following CSS in an article about writing ad headlines. In the HTML code, I used divisions tags with a class name of "headline" to demarcate the headline text. I added the following code to the CSS file:

.headline

{

font-size: 24px;

color: red;

font-weight:bold;

text-align:center

}

HTML and CSS CombineHTML and CSS CombineIn the CSS file, I specified the font-size, color, font-weight, and text-align attributes. The class name was added to the CSS file by preceding the name with a period. I used a semicolon to separate attributes in the list. The HTML and CSS code combine to produce a bold, 24px, red headline centered in the HTML page.

It should be noted that there are some basic HTML tags that are their own class names, and do not require a preceding period in the CSS file. These include p, h, body, li, and others. That being said, these tags can be modified by appending an additional class name to them. For example, if I wanted to make the next paragraph blue, I could add a "blue" class attribute to the opening HTML "p" tag and then add this code to the CSS file:

p.blue

{

color:#0000FF

}

This would be a blue paragraph if this HTML were displayed in color.< p />

Selections Using ID Names

The CSS syntax for an ID is a little different from that used for a class. In the CSS file, ID names are proceeded with a pound sign (#). The example below "floats" my 288px by 59px logo image to the left of the following paragraph: the text flows around the image. I added an ID attribute with a name of "logo" to the HTML "div" start tag I used to demarcate the image information. Here is the CSS code I used:

#logo

{

float:left

}< />

span tagsSpan TagsThe HTML and CSS code would combine to produce the following results:

~~~LOGO WOULD FLOAT HERE~~ Text here would flow around the logo.< />

Selections Using Span Tags

If you want to format just a bit of content, you can use span tags

In the article.css file, I defined a background-color attribute for a "highlight" class that will put a yellow background behind selected text. For the next paragraph, I used span tags to bracket the text, "separate attributes." Here is the CSS code:

.highlight

{

background-color:yellow

}

As a result, and if this were in color, the phrase "separate attributes" would be highlighted with a yellow background.

LOOKS AND LAYOUT

A careful selection of the "global" characteristics used for the body element of your web page will insure that your articles will be both easy to read and aesthetically pleasing to the viewer. These characteristics include font, font color, page background color, and page margins.

I use the "body" code in the CSS file to define the default body display attributes. Here is the CSS body code from the article.css file:

body

{

background: #fffef2;

color: black;

line-height: normal;

margin: 3% 25% 3% 25%;

}

font familyFont FamilyFonts

In the CSS body code, I specify the font family I want to use. The first font listed, Verdana, will be used by a browser if it exists on a viewer's PC. If Verdana is not available, the other fonts will be checked, in order. If none of the specific fonts are available, the browser will default to any available sans-serif font.

If you use a commonly available font/font-family for your articles, the chances are good that a reader will see the article as expected. Otherwise, your article might not look the way it should.

Verdana was designed for easy readability on computer monitors and, for this reason, is my font of choice. Since Verdana is commonly available on PCs, using this as the default font will also increase the likelihood that my article text will be displayed as I intended.

Page Background

I set the background color to a light color, the font color to black, and the line height, or spacing between lines, to normal. The background color I like to use (#fffef2) shows colored text and graphics to good advantage.

Margins

I like to adjust the article on my page to show content in roughly the middle half of the page. I think it is easier for the eye to process than content that goes edge to edge. I use the CSS margin attribute to adjust this. The margin attribute defines the top, right, bottom, and left margins respectively (margin: top right bottom left).

In the CSS body code above, I set the left and right margins to 25% of the available display width. Using 25% places about 60 characters per line of text on my 1024x768 pixel full-screen display. I also set a small 3% margin above and below the content.

Lists

If you use a list in your article, you can use the CSS file to customize the way your list looks. Two important considerations of list design are the list bullet and the spacing between list elements. The example below shows how to change the bullet graphic and element spacing of an unordered list:< />

li

{

list-style-position: inside;

list-style-image: url

http://www.elizabethadamsdirect.com/articles/images/small_blob.gif);

list-style-type: none;

margin-bottom: 1em

}

I added two list attributes to customize the list:

1. list-style-image - used to specify the URL to a bullet image (not shown below), and

2. margin-bottom - used to provide some extra space between list items.

For a complete description of possible list attributes--as well as great tutorials on using HTML and CSS--you can visit http://www.w3schools.com

HTMLHTMLEntity Names

Some characters have special meaning in HTML documents. When you want to use these characters in your text, you can use their "entity names" to prevent browsers from misinterpreting them for HTML code. I used entity names extensively for my web version of this article to display many symbols, particularly in the code samples.

Most commonly, I use entity names in my HTML code for quote marks. By doing this, I get the look and feel I want in my text when I use quotes. For example, when I want to use distinctly different left and right quote-marks in my web-based titles and headlines, I use specific entity names to do so.

Careful attention to the entity names you use can add "that extra touch of class" to your articles.

For HTML 4.01, there are entity names for both ASCII and extended characters and symbols. I use an entity name to insert a copyright symbol at the bottom of all of my web pages. You can find a complete list of entity names at w3schools.

I use Dreamweaver 8 for my HTML and CSS editing. With Dreamweaver, I can validate my code as I write it. I have optioned the validator to warn me when entity name substitution might be appropriate.

Validating Your HTML and CSS Code

I like to write valid HTML code for the "!DOCTYPE" version I use. If you click on the w3 validation icon at the bottom of my full-color, web-site version of this article, you will see that the HTML code for the article is valid and error free. You can use the validator accessible through w3schools to check your code, too.

web content writingWeb Content WritingCONCLUSIONS

When you separate your article's content from the code browsers use to display your article, you can focus on using simple, basic HTML code to organize your content. A Cascading Style Sheets(CSS) can accomplish the separation.

A CSS style sheet allows the HTML code for your articles to be cleaner, table-less, easily customizable, and "liquid."

You can look at one of my recently published articles to see the results of using the techniques outlined in this article. The article is "Profitable Ads: How to Write Ads that Pull."

Sincerely Yours,

Elizabeth Adams

For more information, or a free quotation, please contact us.

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Writing Benefit-Driven Web Copy – 4 Steps to More Sales

features offeredFeatures OfferedYou've identified the benefits you offer your customers, but how do you turn a list of benefits into engaging web copy which converts visitors into customers?

Recently I wrote an article explaining how to identify the benefits you offer your customers (http://www.divinewrite.com/benefits.htm). That article challenged business owners and marketing managers to think in terms of benefits rather than features when writing their web copy.

What the article didn’t discuss was how to actually write the web copy once they had identified their benefits. That’s what this article is about. (It even gives you a couple of templates you can use to make your job a whole lot easier!)

As a website copywriter, many of the projects I undertake are completely new websites. The client has some general ideas about what they’d like to convey, but they need someone who can fine-tune their message, and create web copy (and a web structure) which engages their readers. As a result, over the years I’ve developed a process for doing this effectively. There are four main steps:

1. Identify benefits

2. Identify how you deliver these benefits

3. Prioritize your benefits

4. Write the content

Although this article touches on step 1, it’s mostly about steps 2, 3, and 4.

STEP 1 – IDENTIFY YOUR BENEFITS

Branding aside, most websites are about selling. Customers don’t want to know what you can do; they want to know what you can do for THEM. That means the first question you should ask is, “What benefits do I offer my customers?” This is usually the first step toward identifying the key message to be conveyed.

That’s not to say that your website shouldn’t describe your products and services. You just need to make sure it describes them in terms of benefits to your customer.

But benefits identification is outside the scope of this article. If you’d like to find out more about how to engage your customer with benefits, go to http://www.divinewrite.com/benefits.htm.

over deliverOver DeliverSTEP 2 – IDENTIFY HOW YOU DELIVER THESE BENEFITS

Of course, you can’t just claim to deliver benefits and stop at that. You need to support that claim. On your website, you’re going to need to convince your audience that you actually do deliver these benefits. Anyone can say they deliver benefits, but few can say it persuasively.

From step 1 you’ll have a list of benefits. Now you need to think about how you deliver each benefit in that list. This is where you start talking about features – price, product highlights, distribution channel, competitor weaknesses, external factors, USPs, etc. It’s helpful if you draw up a table with one column for benefits and one for the features which deliver those benefits. (Click http://www.divinewrite.com/downloads/benefitsfeatures.doc to download an example Benefits-Features table – 20KB.)

You will probably find this process much easier than identifying benefits. In fact, you’ve probably got most of this information written down already… somewhere. If not, chances are you uncovered a good portion of it when you were brainstorming for benefits.

TIP: If you’re having trouble identifying supporting features, before filling out the table, try listing everything you can think of which relates to what you do, and how you do it. Don’t worry about the order. Just brain-dump onto a piece of paper, a whiteboard, a Word document, anywhere… Don’t leave anything out, even if it seems unimportant. (You’d be surprised how important even the most insignificant details can become once you start assigning them to benefits.) If you start getting lost, think back to the question you’re trying to answer: How do you deliver your list of benefits to your customer? Once you’ve done your brain-dump, read through it, and decide which specific benefit each feature delivers

Benefits offeredBenefits OfferedSTEP 3 – PRIORITISE YOUR BENEFITS

Now that you’ve identified all the things you COULD say, it’s time to figure out what you SHOULD say and where you should say it. This is where your benefits-features table comes into play. Read through your list of benefits and prioritize them according to how compelling they will be to your reader.

The reason for this? Priority determines prominence. The most compelling benefits will need to be prominent on your site.

TIP: Be aware that your list may include some benefits which everyone in your business category could claim. In other words, they’re not just specific to your company, but apply to the type of service you offer. For example, if you sell a Content Management System (CMS) for website creation, you may list “Greater control for marketing managers” and “Less expense updating content” as benefits. Every CMS vendor could claim these benefits, so you’ll need to question their importance. Will they differentiate you from your competitors? Generic benefits can be useful if none of your competitors are using them, or if you feel you need to educate your market a bit before launching into company-specific benefits.

STEP 4 – WRITE YOUR CONTENT

So now you know what you’d like to say, it’s time to decide how to say it. This is about three things:

1. Subject – What is the subject of your site; features or benefits?

2. Structure – How do you structure your site such that your customers will read your most compelling benefits?

3. Words – What words should you use to best engage your audience (and the search engines)?

The remainder of this article is dedicated to Subject and Structure. For further discussion of Words, see http://www.divinewrite.com/webwriting.htm and http://www.divinewrite.com/seocopy.htm).

Subject

What is the subject of your site; features or benefits? The answer to this question lies in audience identification. If your audience knows a bit about the type of product or service you’re selling, lead with features (e.g. processor speed, turnaround time, uptime, expertise, educational qualifications, wide product range, etc.). But make sure you talk about their benefits, and make sure the features offering the most important benefits are the most prominent.

services offeredServices OfferedHere’s a simplified example…

“Cool Widgets offers:

* Standard Operating Environment – Significantly reducing the complexity of your IT infrastructure

* System upgrades which are less expensive to license – Providing excellent TCO reductions”

In cases where you’re selling to an audience who knows very little about your product or service, lead with benefits (e.g. if you’re selling something technical to a non-technical audience).

Here’s the same simplified example, reversed for a novice audience…

“Cool Widgets offers:

* Reduced complexity of IT infrastructure – We can implement a Standard Operating Environment for your organization

* Reduced TCO – We can upgrade your IT to systems which are less expensive to license”

Structure

How do you structure your site in such a way that your customers will be sure to read your most compelling benefits? The answer is, keep it short ‘n sweet. And make it scan-able. This doesn’t mean you have to cut features or benefits. You just have to structure your site to accommodate your message.

While every site is different, as a rule of thumb it’s a good idea to introduce your main features and benefits on your home page. Summarize them – preferably using bullet points, but at the very least, clearly highlight them so that your audience can scan-read (e.g. bold, underline, colour, link).

special featuresSpecial FeaturesThen link from each summarized feature or benefit to a detailed description. Try to keep each page to approximately 200-400 words. You may need several pages to detail all your features and benefits. (Click http://www.divinewrite.com/downloads/pagestructure.doc to download a page structure template – 29KB.)

TIP: In cases where you need to introduce features and benefits which are generic to your field (rather than specific to your offering), your home page is generally the best place to do it. From there, you can lead to a second page summarizing the specific features and benefits of your offering.

Conclusion

Web copy is about far more than just clever words. It’s essential that you identify the benefits you offer your customer, and that you can convince your customer you actually deliver those benefits.

I hope that the guidance and tools provided in this article will help you on your way to engaging web copy which converts to sales.

Happy writing!

For a free quotation or more information, please do not hesitate to contact us

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Writing Effective ALT Text For Images

Alt TextAlt-TextAnyone who knows anything about web accessibility knows that images need alternative, or ALT, text assigned to them. This is because screen readers can't understand images, but rather read aloud the alternative text assigned to them. In Internet Explorer we can see this ALT text, simply by mousing over the image and looking at the yellow tooltip that appears. Other browsers (correctly) don't do this.

But surely there can't be a skill to writing ALT text for images? You just pop a description in there and you're good to go, right? Well, kind of. Sure, it's not rocket science, but there are a few guidelines you need to follow...

Spacer images and missing ALT text

Spacer images should always be assigned null ALT text, or alt="" . This way most screen readers will completely ignore the image and won't even announce its presence. Spacer images are invisible images that pretty most websites use. The purpose of them is, as the name suggests, to create space on the page. Sometimes it's not possible to create the visual display you need, so you can stick an image in (specifying its height and width) and volià, you have the extra space you need.

Not everyone uses this null ALT text for spacer images. Some websites stick in alt="spacer image". Imagine how annoying this can be for a screen reader user, especially when you have ten of them in a row. A screen reader would say, “Image, spacer image” ten times in a row (screen readers usually say the word, “Image”, before reading out its ALT text) - now that isn't helpful!

Other web developers simply leave out the ALT attribute for spacer images (and perhaps other images). In this case, most screen readers will read out the filename, which could be ‘newsite/images/onepixelspacer.gif’. A screen reader would announce this image as “Image, new-site slash images slash one pixel spacer dot gif”. Imagine what this would sound like if there were ten of these in a row!

Bullets and icons

Bullets and icons should be treated in much the same way as spacer images, so should be assigned null alternative text, or alt="". Think about a list of items with a fancy bullet proceeding each item. If the ALT text, ‘Bullet’ is assigned to each image then, “Image, bullet” will be read aloud by screen readers before each list item, making it take that bit longer to work through the list.

Icons, usually used to complement links, should also be assigned alt="". Many websites, which place the icon next to the link text, use the link text as the ALT text of the icon. Screen readers would first announce this ALT text, and then the link text, so would then say the link twice, which obviously isn't necessary.

(Ideally, bullets and icons should be called up as background images through the CSS document - this would remove them from the HTML document completely and therefore remove the need for any ALT description.)

no alt textNo Alt TextDecorative images

Decorative images too should be assigned null alternative text, or alt="". If an image is pure eye candy then there's no need for a screen reader user to even know it's there and being informed of its presence simply adds to the noise pollution.

Conversely, you could argue that the images on your site create a brand identity, and by hiding them from screen reader users, you're denying this group of users the same experience. Accessibility experts tend to favour the former argument, but there certainly is a valid case for the latter too.

Navigation & text embedded within images

Navigation menus that require fancy text have no choice but to embed the text within an image. In this situation, the ALT text shouldn't be used to expand on the image. Under no circumstances should the ALT text say, ‘Read all about our fantastic services, designed to help you in everything you do’. If the menu item says, ‘Services’ then the ALT text should also say ‘Services’. ALT text should always describe the content of the image and should repeat the text word-for-word. If you want to expand on the navigation, such as in this example, you can use the title attribute.

The same applies for any other text embedded within an image. The ALT text should simply repeat, word-for-word, the text contained within that image.

(Unless the font being used is especially unique it's often unnecessary to embed text within images - advanced navigation and background effects can now be achieved with CSS.)

Company logo

Websites tend to vary in how they apply ALT text to logos. Some say, ‘Company name’, others ‘Company name logo’, and other describe the function of the image (usually a link back to the homepage), ‘Back to home’. Remember, ALT text should always describe the content of the image so the first example, alt="Company name", is probably the best. If the logo is a link back to the homepage then this can be effectively communicated through the title tag.

blind person with screen readerBlind Person With Screen ReaderConclusion

Writing effective ALT text isn't too difficult. If it's a decorative image then null alternative text, or alt="" should usually be used - never, ever omit the ALT attribute. If the image contains text then the ALT text should simply repeat this text, word-for-word. Remember, ALT text should describe the content of the image and nothing more.

Do also be sure also to keep ALT text as short and succinct as possible. Listening to a web page with a screen reader takes a lot longer than traditional methods, so don't make the surfing experience painful for screen reader users with bloated and unnecessary ALT text.

For more information, or a free quotation, please contact us

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What are Web Standards?

web standardsWeb StandardWeb standards are technologies, established by the W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) and other standards bodies, that are used to create and understand web-based content. In order for the Web to reach its full potential, the most fundamental Web technologies must be compatible with one another and allow any hardware and software used to access the Web to work together. Therefore, to lead the World Wide Web to its full potential, protocols and guidelines have been developed that ensure long-term growth for the Web.

How does your business benefit from adopting web standards

Lower development costs:

This is due to simpler development and maintenance using more semantic and structured HTML. The one site will work with all major browsers.

Lower hosting costs:

Less HTML results in smaller file sizes and quicker downloads. Smaller file sizes mean lower bandwidth which will lower hosting costs.

Increase in usability:

Your customers will find your site renders and downloads faster due to the smaller file size. This will make them respond and showi more interest in what you have to offer in your business.

website development Website DevelopmentIncrease in accessibility:

Semantic HTML, where structure is separated from Website Development presentation, makes it easier for screen readers and alternative browsing devices to decipher the content.

Increase in search ability:

Semantic HTML, where structure is separated from presentation, makes the content represent a larger part of the total file content. Combined with semantic markup this will improve search engine rankings. As your site search ability increases, so will your potential clients.

Better brand control:

When presentation is separated by content, you have much better control over the branding of your sites. Your sites that channel content to conventional browsers, on PDA and mobile phones can be controlled by just changing the style sheet(s).

For a free quotation, please contact us,

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Xsitepro Website Builder - Facts you should know

xsiteproXsiteproXsitepro is one of the leading software's in the Internet Marketing industry. It has been popular among the masses of Seo's and Internet Marketers looking for a less time consuming means of quality internet rankings. But does this software hold up in its validity? Is this software really all that good? Let's take a look at form versus function to let you decide whether or not xsitepro is for you.

Generally speaking, xsitepro is for the user who:

A. Doesn't know html, or wants a solution for writing html that is quick and effective. With this software you will not need to know html, however there are limitations in its use.

B. Wants to pump out websites in a matter of hours or less. Xsitepro allows the user to make fast websites that are seo friendly in a matter of hours if not minutes, again there are some limitations to this. This means more money in a shorter amount of time.

C. Wants to make Search Engine friendly websites without the use of an SEO expert. In other words, Xsite pro allows someone to follow step by step seo rules as well as tells you when you've done something wrong. This makes an excellent program for those who do not know the first thing about SEO or who want to expand their basic know-how.

D. Wants a cheap alternative to Dreamweaver and other more expensive website builders. Xsitepro is generally pretty cheap among the many website designing programs. This is a great html editor for the newbie who wants to compete in the Internet Marketing industry.

xsitepro templatesXsitepro TemplatesXsitepro is not for the user who:

A. Wants to use primarily flash or highly interactive websites. Xsitepro is a little limited on exactly what you can do as far as creating intricate websites.

B. Wants websites that lay outside the standard template forms. In other words, you basically have to stick with the standard template in which you can re size and move around. However, this still is limiting to some but not many.

C. Wants complete freedom to do many different types of functions. Xsite pro offers a lot of freedom to do a lot of different functions, however it doesn't give you total power over what you want to do. Keep in mind though, that you are able to edit any sort of code within the html of the body of your pages.

So basically stated, this software is perfect for those who are either Internet Marketers, Basic Web Designers, Newbies, Under time constraints, or want a cheaper alternative to more expensive web design programs. You probably would reconsider buying xsitepro if you were either a coder, or advanced web designer. In other words, this software performs more for function than form. So keep this in mind when deciding on a web design software that fits your needs. Xsitepro may or may not be what you are looking for.

Please contact us to discuss your website requirements or for a free quotation.

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